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Hand Disorders and Deformities (Subscribe)

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Acquired Hand Deformities (28)
Acquired Hand Deformities
MeSH Search Term "Hand Deformities, Acquired"[mesh]
ICD-10 Code M21 [4] Other acquired deformities of limbs [Hand]
SNOMED-CT Term Acquired deformity of hand (disorder) Concept ID:66327008
Congenital Hand Deformities (117)
Congenital Hand Deformities
MeSH Search Term "Upper Extremity Deformities, Congenital"[mesh]
ICD-10 Code Q68.1 Congenital deformity of hand
SNOMED-CT Term Congenital anomaly of the hand (disorder) Concept ID: 34111000

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2001 Biomechanics of the Wrist and Hand

These (physio) lab problems are designed to help students review hand anatomy, to relate their existing knowledge to functional considerations, and to introduce new material.
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Rehabilitation Sciences 2001

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2004 Infectious and Inflammatory Flexor Tenosynovitis eMedicine Orthopedics

Flexor tenosynovitis (FT) is a pathophysiologic state causing disruption of normal flexor tendon function in the hand. A variety of etiologies are responsible for this process. Most acute cases of FT are the result of infection. However, FT also can be secondary to acute or chronic inflammation as a result of diabetes, overuse, or arthritis. Much of the original work on infectious FT was done by Kanavel. If a patient presents with the 4 Kanavel signs, septic FT is diagnosed. The 4 Kanavel signs are (1) finger held in slight flexion, (2) fusiform swelling, (3) tenderness along the flexor tendon sheath, and (4) pain with passive extension of the digit. The process has the ability to rapidly destroy a finger's functional capacity and is considered an orthopedic emergency.
Synonyms and related keywords: acute flexor tenosynovitis, flexor tendon sheath infection, flexor tenosynovitis, pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis, suppurative flexor tenosynovitis, septic flexor tenosynovitis
Likes & Ghidella 2004 Updated 2009

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2009 (Updated) Benign Hand Tumors eMedicine Plastics

Benign tumors of the hand may be categorized using the different anatomic subunits of the hand. Each subunit has potential for disease processes and abnormal growth. Notably, the musculoskeletal, vascular, osseous, perionychial, cutaneous, and soft tissue elements can develop benign lesions that may manifest as localized masses of the hand. Excluding cutaneous malignancy, 95% of tumors of the hand are benign. The nonneoplastic ganglion is probably the most common mass found on the hand and wrist. Some benign growths may not need excision (Athanasian, 1993). Following ganglions, inclusion cysts, warts, giant cell tumors, granulomas, and hemangiomas follow in frequency. This article outlines each of the subunits and discusses benign growths that may exist in each anatomic structure.
Synonyms and related keywords: benign hand tumors, vascular tumor, hemangioma, enchondroma, ganglion, hand tumor, hand mass, hand lesion, nonneoplastic ganglion, non-neoplastic ganglion, hand cyst, hand warts, warts, giant cell tumor, granuloma, hemangioma, benign growths, port wine stain, port-wine stain, nevus flammeus, Kasabach-Merritt syndrome, glomus tumor, Ollier disease, Ollier's disease, enchondromatosis, subperiosteal osteoid osteomas, osteoid osteomas, osteomas, schwannoma, neurilemmoma, fibrolipomatous hamartoma, hamartoma, neurofibroma, von Recklinghausen disease, von Recklinghausen's disease, neurofibromatosis, mucous cyst, mucus cyst, mucosal cyst, pseudosarcomatous fibromatosis, nodular fasciitis, pyogenic granuloma, nodular tenosynovitis, lipoma
Lin & Dumanian 2006

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2011 Growth diagrams for individual finger strength in children measured with the RIHM CORR Open Access

Results Because there was no difference in strength between boys and girls and between dominant and nondominant hands, both hands and genders were combined in one growth diagram for each measurement. The normative data were presented in a table format and in growth diagrams for each myometer measurement.
Conclusions These diagrams can be used for pediatric patients such as patients with congenital malformations or neuromuscular disorders who receive interventions or therapy aimed at function of the hand, fingers, or thumb. The growth diagrams facilitate distinguishing between the effects of growth and intervention on strength development.
Growth diagrams for individual finger strength in children measured with the RIHM. Molenaar HM, Selles RW, Willemsen SP, Hovius SE, Stam HJ. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Mar;469(3):868-76. (full text)

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A Physician With Osteomyelitis

New Orleans Citywide Rounds A Physician With Osteomyelitis from Infections in Medicine ® 2001 Melissa Wynn, MD, Richard J. Wallace, Jr, MD, Katherine Baumgarten, MD, and Julia Garcia Diaz, MD, Introduction A 51-year-old male physician, previously healthy, was admitted for evaluation and treatment of an infected wrist. Initially, a papule had developed on his right index finger 17 months before admission. At that time, he stated that he frequently obtained minor lacerations while hunting and fishing in the marshes. He lanced the papule, but it did not heal; subsequently, it became violaceous and edematous. He self-medicated with cephalexin, 1g tid, for approximate-ly 2 weeks and followed this with doxycycline, 100 mg/d, for 4 weeks but noted no improvement.

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Arthritis- Basal joint arthritis

Thumb basal joint arthritis is a common condition which often affects both hands. It is painless in some people, but others have great difficulty because of pain and weakness of pinch. Over time, the thumb may draw into the palm and be compensated by stretching and hyperextending the adjacent metacarpophalangeal joint.

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Arthritis- Basal joint arthroplasty with split abductor pollicis longus graft

There are many variations on the procedure of soft tissue basal joint arthroplasty. In this case, the abductor pollicis longus tendon is split with a custom tendon stripper and used as a distally based graft for ligament reconstruction and interposition.

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Arthritis- diffuse inflammatory osteoarthritis

This woman in her 30's presented with left wrist pain and was found to have inflammatory osteoarthritic changes throughout her wrist, distal radioulnar joint and thumb basal joint. Blood tests were normal, including rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, sedimentation rate, uric acid, and complete blood count. She was treated with nonsteroidal oral antiinflammatory medication and splints.

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Arthritis- Osteoarthritis

Clinical photographs of osteoarthritis hands and digits

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Chronic Instability of the Distal Radioulnar Joint A Review

Although our understanding of human anatomy has grown rapidly, the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) remains one of the least understood joints in the body. Problems of the DRUJ have been called by Palmer as the "low back pain of the wrist". Over the last 15 years, there has been a tremendous surge in research involving the anatomy, function, and treatment of DRUJ pathology. Yet, there is still no consensus as to the pathomechanics and the treatment of DRUJ pathology.
Stefan Fornalski, B.S., Thay Q. Lee, Ph.D., and Ranjan Gupta, M.D. University of Pennsylvania Orthopaedic Journal Volume 13 Spring 2000 Pages 1-9

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Distal Radioulnar Joint Problems and Treatment Options

Forearm rotation and stability depend on the normal anatomic relationships about the radioulnar joints (distal and proximal), the interosseous membrane, and the shape of the forearm bones. Injuries to any of these structures result in pain, decreased strength, limited range of motion, and loss of forearm function. This article discusses the problems and their management options concerning the distal radioulnar joint based on the current literature.
Kagan Ozer, MD; Luis R. Scheker, MD ORTHOPEDICS 2006; 29:38

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Felon eMedicine Emergengy

Felons are closed-space infections of the fingertip pulp.
Fingertip pulp is divided into numerous small compartments by vertical septa that stabilize the pad. Infection occurring within these compartments can lead to abscess formation, edema, and rapid development of increased pressure in a closed space. This increased pressure may compromise blood flow and lead to necrosis of the skin and pulp.
Synonyms and related keywords: closed-space infections, fingertip pulp, paronychias, hand infections, osteomyelitis, tenosynovitis, septic arthritis, Staphylococcus aureus, S aureus, Eikenella corrodens, E corrodens, wood splinter, minor cut, cellulitis, skin necrosis, felon, finger infection, fingertip infection
Author: Glen Vaughn, MD 2006

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Hand and Wrist Conditions Orthoteers

Major resource on hand and wrist conditions. Requires registration.

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Hand Infections eMedicine Emergency

In 1939, Kanavel, author of the landmark Infections of the Hand, observed, "In almost all cases of serious infection the difficulty is to make a correct diagnosis both as to the nature of the infection and the position of the pus." Specific infections covered in this article include paronychia, felon, herpetic whitlow, tenosynovitis, and deep fascial space infections.
Synonyms and related keywords: hand infection, infections of the hand, paronychia, felon, herpetic whitlow, infectious tenosynovitis, deep fascial space infections, acute paronychia, hangnails, nail biting, manicuring, finger sucking, eponychia, artificial nails, chronic paronychia, metastatic cancer, subungual melanoma, squamous cell cancer, floating nail, subungual abscess, herpes simplex virus infection of the finger, HSV infection of the finger, HSV-1, HSV-2, dorsal subaponeurotic abscess, subfascial web space infection, midpalmar space infection, thenar space infection, Staphylococcus aureus, S aureus, Streptococcus species, Candida albicans, C albicans, atypical mycobacteria, Neisseriagonorrhoeae, N gonorrhoeae, Eikenella corrodens, E corrodens, Pasteurella multocida, P multocida, Capnocytophaga species, frank abscess, osteomyelitis
Authors: Rohini Jonnalagadda, MD & Gregory S Johnston, MD 2008

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