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A survey study on Turk-Orthopod

CONCLUSION: Our electronic discussion group, Turk-orthopod, has proved to be a quick communication tool, presenting a considerable potential to contribute to continuous medical education of Turkish orthopedists.
A survey study on "Turk-Orthopod", a Turkish electronic discussion group in orthopedics and traumatology Arazi M, Yaman H, Heybeli N. Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc. 2004;38(4):277-81. Full text authors translation

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ABJS Carl T Brighton Workshop on Health Informatics in Orthopaedic Surgery

Editorial comment on the workshop held Nov 2009 on Health Informatics in Orthopaedic Surgery
Christian Veillette

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Creating an Index of Orthopaedic Information on the Internet

Many people have become so frustrated with the difficulty of finding useful orthopaedic information on the Internet that they have concluded there is not any worth the bother. While it is possible to develop the skill needed to search more effectively and find good stuff, there could be a shortcut: an index of addresses for web pages with orthopaedic content.
Issues in Orthopaedic Informatics - Creating an Index of Orthopaedic Information on the Internet J.F. Myles Clough, M.D., FRCSC Kamloops, BC COA Bulletin

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Defining Orthopaedic Subject Matter

Deciding what to call an orthopaedic subject is a "housekeeping" issue but none the less vital. Orthopaedics is full of synonyms and acronyms. But to search electronically, one needs a unique name or code that can be added to every piece of information that relates to that subject. Only then can one rely on searches to turn up all the information one is looking for.
Issues in Orthopaedic Informatics - Defining Orthopaedic Subject Matter J.F. Myles Clough, M.D., FRCSC COA Bulletin

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Finding Orthopaedic Information on the Internet - Part 1 The Literature

Access to the major citations databases of the scientific literature is one of the great contributions the Internet has made to the practice of orthopaedics. The Medline database of the US National Library of Medicine (NLM) has been online at the PubMed site for three years now. It has 102 journals exclusively concerned with orthopaedics, hand surgery or orthopaedic sports medicine. There are some publications like the COA Bulletin, which are not in Medline, but most of the major orthopaedic journals are. A properly conducted search of Medline will yield a very valuable review of the literature. Each "citation" in Medline contains the reference, the authors, the abstract (where available) and the keywords used to index the entry.
Finding Orthopaedic Information on the Internet - Part 1 The Literature Myles Clough, M.D., FRCSC

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Finding Orthopaedic Information on the Internet - Part II

Using Internet search engines to find orthopaedic information is even more of an art form and even more frustrating than finding citations to the literature. We need to visit that subject in the future but for now, we will concentrate on using sites which are more or less guaranteed to have reasonably high quality information on a wide variety of orthopaedic subjects. If you wish to surf the Orthopaedic Internet to find what orthopaedic surgeons have contributed, to gain ideas and to find the gaps into which your own contributions may fit, this would be a reasonable way to start.
Finding Orthopaedic Information on the Internet - Part II Myles Clough, M.D., FRCSC

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Finding Orthopaedic Information on the Internet - Part III Using Search Engines

Using search engines is a popular and seemingly easy way to find information on the Internet, however, it is much less predictable than the other two methods and is responsible for much of the bad press the Internet receives from serious users.
Finding Orthopaedic Information on the Internet - Part III Using Search Engines Myles Clough, M.D., FRCSC COA Bulletin

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Information Technology and Orthopaedic Education

This article is an entry to the literature on the use of information technology (IT) both in orthopaedic trainee education and in CME, as well as a brief review of useful Internet resources.
Information Technology and Orthopaedic Education Myles Clough, M.D., FRCSC Christian Veillette, M.D., FRCSC

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Internet Access Produces Misinformed Patients

The Internet has produced a truly phenomenal increase in access to information. This is really only helpful to patients if the information is filtered and appropriate to their specific needs. Too often patients access information about conditions they have self-diagnosed and bring it to the consultation with their physician, who then has to spend time disabusing the patients of the misinformation they have accumulated. Patients also return home from their initial consultation, access the Internet, and come up with all manner of promotional information from companies and even orthopedic practices that they want explained to them by their physician. It is the overwhelming conclusion of orthopedic specialists that this kind of Internet use is actually a burden for them in caring for patients and is not contributing to patient enlightenment. It does not have to be this way, if physicians will do just 2 things: first, create white papers for patients that address common current questions, such as surgical approach or bearing surfaces for implants and why we do what we do. This is a huge time saver and will preempt many questions. Second, develop their own website or select excellent nonprejudicial sites to which they can refer patients. To do less will invite a neverending parade of questions irrelevant to patient welfare.
Internet Access Produces Misinformed Patients: Managing the Confusion By David S. Hungerford, MD ORTHOPEDICS 2009; 32:658 Full text

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Internet versus mailed questionnaires

OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether using Web-based technology could increase the response rates to an international survey.
CONCLUSIONS: Our Internet-based survey to surgeons resulted in a significantly lower response rate than a traditional mailed survey. Researchers should not assume that the widespread availability and potential ease of Internet-based surveys will translate into higher response rates.
Internet versus mailed questionnaires: a controlled comparison (2). Leece P, Bhandari M, Sprague S, Swiontkowski MF, Schemitsch EH, Tornetta P, Devereaux PJ, Guyatt GH. J Med Internet Res. 2004 Oct 29;6(4):e39.

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Issues in Orthopaedic Informatics

nformatics is the study of the use of information. Since most medical subjects, such as orthopaedics, deal with an overload of information, it is unfortunate that informatics is a neglected area. Most of our research effort is put into accumulating more information; in contrast, this article rather focuses on the need to use the information we have already produced in a more fruitful, objective and scientific way.
Clough JFM COA Bulletin

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Orthopaedics Networks and Computers

Orthopaedic surgery has not yet fully grasped the remarkable potential of information technology. Instinctive opposition to ‘computer medicine’ is inherent. Human pattern recognition and memory, if properly trained, are faster and more accurate than any computer system. The problem is that absorbing and retaining the necessary knowledge have become impossible in the wide field of surgery.
The potential of computers to support information management, administration, research and clinical practice in surgery has hardly been touched. Only simple clinical and administrative information is currently being managed by most hospital information systems. The progress made in surgical information technology is a complicated mix of abysmal failures, near successes and unconditional triumphs.
Annotation: Orthopaedics, Networks and Computers Clough J.F.M. & Oliver C.W. JBJS B 2002;84-B:481-5.

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PDAs and the Orthopaedic Surgeon

So someone gave you one of those cool new Palm devices so that you can get organized and stop leaving little slips of paper around the office and home. Well, the device is still sitting in the box, but with good intentions to start using it when you have the time. Up until now you have functioned just fine, thank you, without any electronic gadgets. The question is what can the PDA (personal device assistant) do for you that you can't already do now? The quick answer is not much more, but maybe a little more efficiently and certainly with more flare.
PDAs and the Orthopaedic Surgeon Don Johnson, M.D., FRCSC

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PubMed Search for Orthopaedics on the Internet

Uses the search string "orthopaedics"[MeSH Terms] AND "internet"[Majr]

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Qualitative content analysis of questions asked by visitors to an orthopaedics Web site

This study analyzes what people search for when they use a health-education Web site offering information about arthritis, orthopaedics, and sports-medicine topics. Additionally, it determines who is performing these searches: is it patients, friends or relatives of patients, or neither? Finally, it examines the similarities and differences among questions submitted by Web site visitors from different countries. METHODS: Content analysis was performed on 793 free-text search queries submitted to a patient-education Web site owned and operated by the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine at the University of Washington Medical Center. The 793-query data set was coded into 3 schemes: (1) the purpose of the query, (2) the topic of the query, and (3) the relationship between the asker of the query and the patient. We determined the country from which each query was submitted by analyzing the Internet Protocol addresses associated with the queries. RESULTS: The 5 most frequent reasons visitors searched the Web site were to seek: (1) information about a condition, (2) information about treatment, (3) information about symptoms, (4) advice about symptoms, and (5) advice about treatment. We were able to determine the relationship between the person submitting the query and the patient in question for 178 queries. Of these, the asker was the patient in 140 cases, and the asker was a friend or relative of the patient in 38 cases. The queries were submitted from 34 nations, with most coming from the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom, and Canada. When comparing questions submitted from the United States versus those from all other countries, the 3 most frequent types of questions were the same for both groups (and were the top 3 question types listed above). CONCLUSIONS: These results provide the University of Washington Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, as well as other organizations that provide health-information Web sites, with data about what people around the world are seeking when they turn to the Internet for health information. If Web site managers can adapt their health-information Web sites in response to these findings, patients may be able to find and use Internet-based health information more successfully, enabling them to participate more actively in their health care.
What are patients seeking when they turn to the Internet? Qualitative content analysis of questions asked by visitors to an orthopaedics Web site. Shuyler KS, Knight KM. J Med Internet Res. 2003 Oct 10;5(4):e24.

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