Nerve Compression (Subscribe)

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (16)
Internet resources relating to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Entrapment of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel, which is formed by the flexor retinaculum and the carpal bones.
MeSH Search Term "Carpal Tunnel Syndrome"[mesh]
ICD-10 Code G56.0 Carpal tunnel syndrome
SNOMED-CT Term Carpal tunnel syndrome (disorder) Concept ID: 57406009
Synonyms - Carpal tunnel syndrome
Median nerve entrapment
Carpal tunnel
Carpal canal
CTS - Carpal tunnel syndrome
Median nerve compression
Carpal tunnel syndrome (disorder)
Cubital Tunnel Syndrome (17)
Internet resources relating to Cubital Tunnel Syndrome. Compression of the ULNAR NERVE in the cubital tunnel, which is formed by the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, humeral-ulnar aponeurosis, and medial ligaments of the elbow.
MeSH Search Term "Cubital Tunnel Syndrome"[mesh]
ICD-10 Code G56.2 Lesion of ulnar nerve
SNOMED-CT Term Cubital tunnel syndrome (disorder) Concept ID: 56177003
Ulnar Nerve Compression (8)
Ulnar Nerve Compression Syndromes. Ulnar neuropathies caused by mechanical compression of the nerve at any location from its origin at the BRACHIAL PLEXUS to its terminations in the hand. Common sites of compression include the retroepicondylar groove, cubital tunnel at the elbow (Cubital Tunnel Syndrome - considered separately), and Guyon's canal at the wrist.
MeSH Search Term "Ulnar Nerve Compression Syndromes"[mesh]
ICD-10 Code G56.2 Lesion of ulnar nerve
SNOMED-CT Term Ulnar nerve entrapment (disorder) Concept ID: 277188003

Links

2010 Peroneal Mononeuropathy eMedicine Neurology

Mononeuropathies can occur secondary to direct trauma, compression, stretch injury, ischemia, infection, or inflammatory disease. Dancers are also prone to superficial and deep peroneal nerve entrapments.
Nerve entrapments are due to compression of the nerve by either normal structures or an external source. In the lower extremity, peroneal neuropathy is the most common isolated mononeuropathy. In patients of our electrodiagnostic laboratory, it is the third most common mononeuropathy overall.
Pinky Agarwal, MD Alida Griffith, MD Updated: Aug 3, 2010

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Compression of the sciatic nerve by wear debris following total hip replacement

Pain in the distribution of the sciatic nerve is common in the elderly. In the presence of a long-standing joint replacement, consideration should be given as to whether compression might be due to an extraspinal cause. We present three women, in whom a mass of wear debris from a previous total hip replacement caused compression of the sciatic nerve posterior to the hip. The symptoms were relieved immediately following operation.
Compression of the sciatic nerve by wear debris following total hip replacement. A report of three cases. J. R. Crawford, L. Van Rensburg, C. Marx: J Bone Joint Surg [Br] 2003;85-B:1178-80. Full Text

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Medial plantar nerve compression by a tibial artery schwannoma

The authors describe the case of a patient with a novel cause of medial plantar symptoms due to extrinsic compression by a schwannoma arising within the adventitia of the tibial artery in the ankle region. Additionally they provide the operative, histological, and imaging findings.
Medial plantar nerve compression by a tibial artery schwannoma. Case report Robert J. Spinner, M.D., Bernd W. Scheithauer, M.D., and Kimberly K. Amrami, M.D. J Neurosurgery May 2007 Volume 106, Number 5

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Meralgia Paresthetica eMedicine Orthopedics

Kornbluth & Malone 2006
Meralgia paresthetica is a common but underrecognized condition that is manifested by pain, numbness, and tingling in the anterior and lateral parts of the thigh. Bernhardt first described symptoms corresponding to meralgia paresthetica in 1878. In 1885, Hagar correctly suggested that lateral femoral cutaneous nerve compression was the source of this symptom complex; surgical correction of meralgia paresthetica also dates back to Hagar at this time. A decade later, Roth coined the term meralgia paresthetica from the Greek words meros (thigh) and algos (pain).
Synonyms and related keywords: lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuropathy, neuropraxic injury, axonotmesis, neurotmesis, thigh pain, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve compression, leg neuropathy, thigh neuropathy

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Meralgia Paresthetica eMedicine PMR

Meralgia paresthetica (MP) is pain or an irritating sensation felt over the anterior or anterolateral aspect of the thigh due to injury, compression, or disease of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN). Early investigators of MP include Bernhardt, who first described the condition in 1878; Hagar, who attributed the pain to compression of the LFCN; and Roth, who coined the term meralgia paresthetica (thigh pain).
Diagnosis of MP is based on history and examination. Nerve conduction studies are used to verify the presence of the neuropathy and rule out other causes for the symptoms. Treatment for uncomplicated or benign forms of MP includes conservative measures initially, followed by surgical intervention for chronic discomfort. Malignant pathologic processes can produce symptoms of MP and, therefore, must be ruled out before conservative treatments are initiated.
Synonyms and related keywords: meralgia paresthetica, Bernhardt-Roth syndrome, lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy
Christopher Luzzio, MD 2007

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Nerve Compression Syndromes

Nerve Compression Syndromes Therapy Desensitization exercises & Therapy
Median
Carpal Tunnel
Pronator Syndrome
Radial
Radial Tunnel
Superficial Radial Nerve
Ulnar
Guyon's Canal
Cubital: Subcutaneous Transposition
Cubital: Submuscular Transposition
Nerve Compression Syndromes Therapy

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Nerve Entrapment Syndromes eMedicine Neurosurgery

The brain and spinal cord receive and send information through muscles and sensory receptors. The information sent to organs is transmitted through nerves. The nerves travel to the upper and lower extremities and traverse the various joints along their paths. Unfortunately, these nerves can become compressed or entrapped at various regions of the extremities.
This article covers some basic principles of entrapment neuropathies, and, within each section, the specifics of the most common entrapment syndromes are summarized. Together, this information should provide the reader with a solid basis for further investigation.
Synonyms and related keywords: nerve entrapment syndromes, nerve compression, chronic nerve injury, entrapment, carpal tunnel, cubital tunnel, meralgia paresthetica, decompression, nerve decompression, nerve entrapment, entrapment neuropathies, chronic compression, carpal tunnel syndrome, posterior interosseous nerve syndrome, PIN, suprascapular nerve entrapment, tarsal tunnel syndrome
Harrop et al 2007

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Nerve Entrapment Syndromes of the Lower Extremity eMedicine Orthopedics

Review of nerve entrapments syndromes from groin to foot
Synonyms and related keywords: iliohypogastric nerve entrapment, ilioinguinal nerve entrapment, genitofemoral nerve entrapment, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve entrapment, femoral nerve entrapment, saphenous nerve entrapment, obturator nerve entrapment, peroneal nerve entrapment, posterior tibial nerve entrapment, tarsal tunnel syndrome, superficial peroneal nerve entrapment, deep peroneal nerve entrapment, interdigital neuritis, Morton metatarsalgia, meralgia paresthetica, Morton neuroma, slimmer's paralysis, strawberry picker's palsy, Tinel sign, heel pain triad
Hollis, Lemay & Jensen 2008

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Peroneal Nerve Palsy Resulting From Fibular Head Osteochondroma OrthoSuperSite

This article describes a case of a 11-year-old boy with an osteochondroma of the peroneal head causing peroneal nerve palsy. Physical examination disclosed large exostoses palpated at the right fibular head. Neurological examination revealed paresis of the tibialis anterior, lateral peroneal, and extensor digitorum muscles with a muscle strength grade of 2. Electrophysiological studies confirmed denervation of the muscles supplied by the right peroneal nerve. Radiological examination showed an osteochondroma in the head of the right fibula. The patient underwent surgical decompression of the right peroneal nerve after resection of the bone tumor. At 36-month follow-up, there was a complete recovery of the deficits.
ORTHOPEDICS July 2009;32(7):528. Peroneal Nerve Palsy Resulting From Fibular Head Osteochondroma by Hichem Mnif, MD; Mustapha Koubaa, MD; Makram Zrig, MD; Nizar Zammel, MD; Abderrazek Abid, MD

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Radial Nerve Entrapment eMedicine Orthopedics

Radial nerve compression or injury may occur at any point along the anatomic course of the nerve and may have varied etiologies. The most frequent site of compression is in the proximal forearm in the area of the supinator muscle and involves the posterior interosseous branch. However, problems can occur proximally in relation to fractures of the humerus at the junction of the middle and proximal thirds, as well as distally on the radial aspect of the wrist.
Author: Mark Stern, MD 2008 Updated: Sep 2, 2009

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Suprascapular nerve entrapment in an arthrodesed shoulder

Suprascapular nerve entrapment is rarely considered as a cause of shoulder pain. We report relief of pain in an arthrodesed shoulder by decompression of the nerve. Case report. An epileptic man in his 20s developed painful post-traumatic arthritis after delayed diagnosis of a posterior dislocation of his left shoulder. Four years later he had a successful arthrodesis and his pain was relieved. One year after the operation he complained of aching pain in the scapular region radiating down the lateral side ofthe arm to the elbow. The pain was constant but aggravated by use of the arm and the patient had been unemployed for two years. Repeated radiographs confirmed that the arthrodesis was sound. The diagnosis of entrapment of the suprascapular nerve was considered, because tenderness was maximal over the suprascapular notch. Injections of local anaesthetic and steroid gave prompt pain relief for one to two weeks
Suprascapular nerve entrapment in an arthrodesed shoulder. Sjöström L, Mjöberg B. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1992 May;74(3):470-1.

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Suprascapular Neuropathy

Suprascapular Neuropathy -- William E.Schobert, M.D.
Suprascapular neuropathy is an underdiagnosed condition that results in impingement syndrome. The suprascapular nerve is primarily a motor nerve that innervates the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus. The neuropathy weakens these muscles unbalancing the rotator cuff force couple. This leads to an "intrinsic" cuff tendonopathy, which can vary, from tendonitis to cuff tear. In throwers, the posterior cuff weakness can place excessive strain on the glenohumeral ligaments resulting in instability symptoms.

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Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome eMedicine Orthopedics

Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a condition that is caused by compression of the tibial nerve or its associated branches as the nerve passes underneath the flexor retinaculum at the level of the ankle or distally.
Synonyms and related keywords: tarsal tunnel neuropathy, entrapment neuropathy of the tibial nerve, posterior tibial neuropathy, compression of the tibial nerve
Gianni Persich, DPM & Steven Touliopoulos, MD 2007

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Tibial and Common Peroneal Nerve Compression in The Popliteal Fossa

This case report describes an uncommon compressive neuropathy involving both the common peroneal and tibial nerves as they pass through the popliteal fossa. The patient is a 16-year-old male who sustained a right knee fracture-dislocation.
D.R.Reichner & G.R.Evans: Tibial and Common Peroneal Nerve Compression in The Popliteal Fossa: A Case Report and Literature Review . The Internet Journal of Plastic Surgery. 2004 Volume 2 Number 1

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Unusual cause of meralgia paraesthetica

Meralgia paraesthetica is caused by entrapment of the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve as it passes under the inguinal ligament. Direct pressure from belts and other tight-fitting garments may contribute to this entrapment. Several clinical conditions have been associated with the development of meralgia paraesthetica, including obesity, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, ascites and trauma to the thigh or inguinal region. We describe a patient having meralgia paraesthetica caused by a left hip joint synovial cyst
Unusual cause of meralgia paraesthetica. Gupta R, Stafford S, Cox N. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2003 Aug;42(8):1005

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